How to grow your child with public speaking



What is the secret to getting your child to say yes when asked to participate in a project or service? What kind of tips can you offer parents who aren’t sure how to get their kids to speak or write? parenting is hard. Even with all the changes that have taken place over the past few decades, there is still a lot we don’t fully understand.

From genetics and environment to mindset and process, many people deal with issues differently than others. When it comes to parenting, it can sometimes feel like you’re on a journey rather than a destination. You’re constantly wondering if you’re on the right path, and if so, where you want to go next. Enter public speaking. This Feldenkrais-like skill allows us to access our deepest powers of humanity while also enabling us to connect with others in a way that feels natural and authentic.

 

What is public speaking?

Kids public speaking is the skill of speaking to large groups of people in a formal, structured way. We do this in order to open up the host to a whole new world of potential and experiences. We lead by talking, while simultaneously encouraging the audience to listen, reflect and participate in the conversation.

How to grow your child with public speaking

Getting your child to say yes when asked to participate in a project or service requires you to have the necessary skills and knowledge. This isn’t easy, but it does get easier with practice. Here are a few tips to help you get your child to say yes more often:

  • Set clear expectations: If you don’t have to do something, don’t use spk about it. Set realistic expectations. If your child doesn’t do something, don’t assume he doesn’t want to. Set realistic goals. Set realistic deadlines. Get involved in your child’s life. Don’t let your child’s Peer teaching stop you from making important, risky choices.
  • Put the work in: When you have the skills and the motivation to do something, it’s much easier to convince other people to do the same. Even if it’s just speaking, speaking to small groups can help you open up the conversation and let others into your world. Put the work in, and then watch as your child switches gears and starts doing the work instead!

The many benefits of public speaking

  • The more you participate in something, the more likely you are to become a witness. If someone tells you something, you’re now officially that person and you have an opportunity to share your story with them.
  • The more you participate, the more open you will be for new experiences. You can now have different projects that you can choose to take on. You can start looking at doing freelance work. You can start mentoring. You can start reading more. You can start taking your online classes. You can start traveling. You can start doing creative projects with your friends.
  • The more you participate, the more likely you are to be heard. If someone else tells you they heard you were amazing, you’re now officially that person and you have an opportunity to share your story with them.
  • The more you participate, the more open you will be for feedback. You can now ask questions and get feedback on your ideas. You can start asking for help. You can start mentoring. You can start doing independent work. You can start traveling. You can start doing creative projects with your friends.

How to start getting your child to speak up

Parents, don’t try to get your child to speak before he’s five years old. That’s too soon to know your child well, and by talking too soon, you’re likely to convince him that he doesn’t have to do something. Instead, try to get him to speak up around the same time he’s starting to crawl. This gives him a better idea of how big of a deal what he’s doing is and he as a parent can better understand how important it is to get your child to start talking.

Take a minute and ask yourself these questions before you talk

  • What is it that I want to say?
  • What is it that my child is trying to get out of me?
  • What is it about this service or project that I’m really interested in?
  • What is it about this person or project that really gets my child talking?
  • What is it about this thing that I’m interested in that someone else is talking about?
  • What is it about this activity or experience that I want to see happen?
  • What is it about this activity that someone else is talking about?
  • What is it about this thing or activity that I want to see happen that someone else is talking about?
  • What is it about this activity that I really want to do?
  • What is it about this project that I really want to take part in?
  • What is it about this thing that I really want to do that someone else is doing something about?

Make a point by having a conversation about it

It’s hard enough to get someone to talk to when you’re just a few words away. It’s even harder to get them to start talking about something you want to do or something that someone else is doing. When you make a point by having a conversation with your child about it, he or she will likely start talking about the project or service in much more depth than they would have otherwise.

It’s natural for kids to start talking more about things that interest them. They don’t normally start talking about anything they don’t necessarily want to do or say anything about, just things they want to do. Pointing out that your child doesn’t necessarily need to do everything you ask him or her to do so you ask them to start talking about what they want to do instead gives them something to think about while they’re at it.

Summing up

Now that you’ve got some ideas and skills under your belt, it will be much easier to get your child to talk up. There are a few things you can do to make this easier for your child and yourself. You can start by starting small. When your child is a little bit older, you can start trying speaking or writing to small groups of people. This can help you get your child to open up the conversation and show him or her that you want to hear everything. Finally, when your child is older, you can start using project-based learning to help him or she strengthen what you told them about.

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